The End of Empire

Dismantle oppression. Deepen democracy. Destroy tyranny.

Posts tagged equality

Oct 1

Aug 3


Jul 20
wonderlandswanderlust:

theendofempire:

Dostoevsky’s notes for chapter 5 of The Brothers KaramazovA beautiful mind… but seriously, the book is pretty androcentric. Kinda boring, in that regard.
From the Wikipedia androcentrism page:

In Western societies today, books, magazine articles and book reviews are written predominantly by men and therefore may privilege a male viewpoint. For instance, in 2010 only 37% of the books published by Random House were written by women, and only 17% of the books reviewed by The New York Review of Books were written by women.[2] Research conducted by VIDA in 2010 found that men wrote the vast majority of articles and book reviews in leading magazines in the United States and the UK.[3]
Research by Dr. David Anderson and Dr. Mykol Hamilton has documented the under-representation of female characters in 200 top-selling children’s books from 2001 and a seven-year sample of Caldecott award-winning books.[4] There were nearly twice as many male main characters as female main characters, and male characters appeared in illustrations 53 percent more than female characters. Most of the plot-lines centered around the male characters and their experiences of life.


This really bothers me. And I’m not talking about the supposed “androcentricity”. It is a novel called The BROTHERS Karamazov. Of course it is going to be about MEN. But Grushenka and Katerina are also major characters, not to mention the other women in the novel. This novel is a work of genius, it is brilliant and beautiful. It is in no way boring simply because it is about men. All these people going on about this lately just rub me the wrong way. I’m not an anti-feminist or anything, but excuse me for not understanding how gender equality equates to bashing men, or making out their accomplishments to be lesser due to this.

Hey - glad to hear your opinion. Seriously… tumblr seems so deviod of interaction sometimes…I sort of wish I could modify my post, but I won’t, cause I think it would be dishonest to hide my own misconceptions. Anyway, I should say I’ve only begun reading the book, but these are my initial impressions. I love love love Dostoyevsky, but I sort of feel a little strange about the way female characters operate in his book. Sure, Dostoyevsky is a man writing about men from a male perspective. As a male author, I’m sure that’s common, just as it might be for female authors. I think I’m just tired of reading novels written with this male voice and through mostly male eyes.I’ve read a bunch of his shorter workers and Crime and Punishment so far, and though I love Dostoyevsky, but there is a certain type of voice, or perspective, lacking. Perhaps this is partially a biproduct of Dostoyevsky’s style. When reading the novel, the perspective shifts a lot - you’re either in a narrator’s perspective, floating over the scene, or in the head of one of the main characters (or it feels like you are because of the way he’s describing them). I’d say that the vast majority of that perspective is male, when we slip into character’s heads, and about men when we are in the narrator’s perspective.It is definitely unfair to say that the female characters are not important, not rich and subtle and important. My personal feeling, however, is that this is part of the mass body of literature in an androcentric form, hence the wikipedia page quote.Most imporantly, it’s not very wise to make sweeping critiques of a book you haven’t finished! These are, however, my initial impressions. Thanks for the reply! Any more?

wonderlandswanderlust:

theendofempire:

Dostoevsky’s notes for chapter 5 of The Brothers Karamazov

A beautiful mind… but seriously, the book is pretty androcentric. Kinda boring, in that regard.

From the Wikipedia androcentrism page:

In Western societies today, books, magazine articles and book reviews are written predominantly by men and therefore may privilege a male viewpoint. For instance, in 2010 only 37% of the books published by Random House were written by women, and only 17% of the books reviewed by The New York Review of Books were written by women.[2] Research conducted by VIDA in 2010 found that men wrote the vast majority of articles and book reviews in leading magazines in the United States and the UK.[3]

Research by Dr. David Anderson and Dr. Mykol Hamilton has documented the under-representation of female characters in 200 top-selling children’s books from 2001 and a seven-year sample of Caldecott award-winning books.[4] There were nearly twice as many male main characters as female main characters, and male characters appeared in illustrations 53 percent more than female characters. Most of the plot-lines centered around the male characters and their experiences of life.

This really bothers me. And I’m not talking about the supposed “androcentricity”. It is a novel called The BROTHERS Karamazov. Of course it is going to be about MEN. But Grushenka and Katerina are also major characters, not to mention the other women in the novel. This novel is a work of genius, it is brilliant and beautiful. It is in no way boring simply because it is about men. 

All these people going on about this lately just rub me the wrong way. I’m not an anti-feminist or anything, but excuse me for not understanding how gender equality equates to bashing men, or making out their accomplishments to be lesser due to this.

Hey - glad to hear your opinion. Seriously… tumblr seems so deviod of interaction sometimes…

I sort of wish I could modify my post, but I won’t, cause I think it would be dishonest to hide my own misconceptions. Anyway, I should say I’ve only begun reading the book, but these are my initial impressions.

I love love love Dostoyevsky, but I sort of feel a little strange about the way female characters operate in his book. Sure, Dostoyevsky is a man writing about men from a male perspective. As a male author, I’m sure that’s common, just as it might be for female authors. I think I’m just tired of reading novels written with this male voice and through mostly male eyes.

I’ve read a bunch of his shorter workers and Crime and Punishment so far, and though I love Dostoyevsky, but there is a certain type of voice, or perspective, lacking. Perhaps this is partially a biproduct of Dostoyevsky’s style. When reading the novel, the perspective shifts a lot - you’re either in a narrator’s perspective, floating over the scene, or in the head of one of the main characters (or it feels like you are because of the way he’s describing them). I’d say that the vast majority of that perspective is male, when we slip into character’s heads, and about men when we are in the narrator’s perspective.

It is definitely unfair to say that the female characters are not important, not rich and subtle and important. My personal feeling, however, is that this is part of the mass body of literature in an androcentric form, hence the wikipedia page quote.

Most imporantly, it’s not very wise to make sweeping critiques of a book you haven’t finished! These are, however, my initial impressions. Thanks for the reply! Any more?

(via creatingcat)


Dostoevsky’s notes for chapter 5 of The Brothers KaramazovA beautiful mind… but seriously, the book is pretty androcentric. Kinda boring, in that regard.
From the Wikipedia androcentrism page:

In Western societies today, books, magazine articles and book reviews are written predominantly by men and therefore may privilege a male viewpoint. For instance, in 2010 only 37% of the books published by Random House were written by women, and only 17% of the books reviewed by The New York Review of Books were written by women.[2] Research conducted by VIDA in 2010 found that men wrote the vast majority of articles and book reviews in leading magazines in the United States and the UK.[3]
Research by Dr. David Anderson and Dr. Mykol Hamilton has documented the under-representation of female characters in 200 top-selling children’s books from 2001 and a seven-year sample of Caldecott award-winning books.[4] There were nearly twice as many male main characters as female main characters, and male characters appeared in illustrations 53 percent more than female characters. Most of the plot-lines centered around the male characters and their experiences of life.

Dostoevsky’s notes for chapter 5 of The Brothers Karamazov

A beautiful mind… but seriously, the book is pretty androcentric. Kinda boring, in that regard.

From the Wikipedia androcentrism page:

In Western societies today, books, magazine articles and book reviews are written predominantly by men and therefore may privilege a male viewpoint. For instance, in 2010 only 37% of the books published by Random House were written by women, and only 17% of the books reviewed by The New York Review of Books were written by women.[2] Research conducted by VIDA in 2010 found that men wrote the vast majority of articles and book reviews in leading magazines in the United States and the UK.[3]

Research by Dr. David Anderson and Dr. Mykol Hamilton has documented the under-representation of female characters in 200 top-selling children’s books from 2001 and a seven-year sample of Caldecott award-winning books.[4] There were nearly twice as many male main characters as female main characters, and male characters appeared in illustrations 53 percent more than female characters. Most of the plot-lines centered around the male characters and their experiences of life.


Jun 15

May 13
“There is nothing more unequal, than the equal treatment of unequal people.” Thomas Jefferson, closet anti-capitalist

Apr 26

Apr 11

Apr 6

Page 1 of 2