The End of Empire

Dismantle oppression. Deepen democracy. Destroy tyranny.

Posts tagged oil

Aug 8
thepeoplesrecord:

In other Chevron news: Chevron faces deadline in $19 billion Ecuador caseAugust 7, 2012
U.S. oil giant Chevron has until midnight tonight to pay a US $19.04 billion Ecuador court judgment for polluting Amazon waterways or officially default and face another lawsuit to seize its assets, this time in Ecuador. Such collection lawsuits are pending against Chevron in Canada and Brazil.
Ecuador Judge Liliana Ortiz on Friday signed an order giving Chevron until midnight tonight to deposit the funds necessary to remediate the oil contamination, which included the dumping of more than 16 billion gallons of toxic waste from oil production into Amazon waterways.
Judge Ortiz’s order comes after almost 19 years of litigation.
The case, Aguinda v. ChevronTexaco, began on November 3, 1993 when 30,000 indigenous people and farmers from Ecuador’s Amazon filed a class action suit against Texaco in New York federal court alleging massive oil contamination of the rainforest.
For 10 years, Texaco argued before U.S. judges that the case should be transferred to Ecuador’s courts. In 2002, a U.S. federal judge granted Texaco’s motion and removed the case to Ecuador on the condition that Texaco submit to jurisdiction there and be bound by any ruling of the Ecuadorian courts.
In the meantime, Chevron bought Texaco in 2001, assuming its liabilities and defense of the case.
Texaco operated in Ecuador from 1964 to 1992, building hundreds of oil production facilities. The trial judge in Lagio Agrio found overwhelming evidence that the company dumped billions of gallons of toxic waste into Amazon waterways as a cost-saving measure.
Five indigenous groups in the area have been harmed by the pollution that covers an area the size of Rhode Island. The contamination also caused an outbreak of cancer that has killed or threatens to kill thousands of people in the area, according to evidence before the court.
Judge Ortiz’s order is the final step under Ecuador civil procedure to certify the 188-page trial court judgment, which was issued on February 11, 2011. That judgement was unanimously affirmed on appeal in early January. It set the amount of the judgment at $18.2 billion.
Last week, Judge Ortiz raised the final amount of the award to $19.041 billion after calculating various mandatory costs required by Ecuador law.
Chevron stripped most of its primary assets, including service stations, from Ecuador years ago and the company no longer operates in the country.
Pablo Fajardo, the lead Ecuador lawyer on the case, says that for practical purposes, Judge Ortiz’s order allows the rainforest communities to execute the Ecuador judgment against Chevron’s remaining assets in their home country.
Fajardo estimates Chevron’s remaining assets in Ecuador are worth roughly $200 million, including a $96 million court judgment the company won recently in an international arbitration proceeding against Ecuador’s government.
Judge Ortiz’s order also puts the plaintiffs in a stronger legal position to pursue recognition of the Ecuador judgment abroad under various international treaties and domestic law statutes.
Collection lawsuits are pending against Chevron in Canada and Brazil, where the company has billions of dollars worth of assets. The plaintiffs are asking courts to seize these assets to satisfy the judgment and finance a cleanup of the oil contamination, said Fajardo.
“People in Ecuador are dying because of Chevron’s pollution and company’s utter contempt for the rule of law,” said Fajardo. “Chevron is going to have to be forced by courts to comply with its legal obligations.”
Chevron maintains the plaintiffs’ allegations that it is responsible for alleged environmental and social harms in the Oriente region of Ecuador are “false.”  Chevron says the company never conducted oil production operations in Ecuador, and its subsidiary Texaco Petroleum Co. (TexPet) “fully remediated its share of environmental impacts arising from oil production operations, before leaving Ecuador in 1992.”
“After the remediation was certified by all agencies of the Ecuadorian government responsible for oversight, TexPet received a complete release from Ecuador’s national, provincial, and municipal governments that extinguished all claims before Chevron acquired TexPet in 2001,” the company says.
“All legitimate scientific evidence exonerates Chevron and proves that the remediated sites pose no significant risks to human health or the environment,” Chevron says on its website.
If Chevron refuses to pay the court judgment, the company will face a greater risk of liability in the enforcement actions already pending, said Karen Hinton, the U.S. spokesperson for the indigenous and farmer plaintiffs.
If Chevron defaults, Fajardo said his legal team will file court actions to seize the intellectual property rights of various Chevron brands in Ecuador, including Havoline.
Source

Capital - will overrun you then outrun you, from your hometown and around the globe, fucking up your shit… 

thepeoplesrecord:

In other Chevron news: Chevron faces deadline in $19 billion Ecuador case
August 7, 2012

U.S. oil giant Chevron has until midnight tonight to pay a US $19.04 billion Ecuador court judgment for polluting Amazon waterways or officially default and face another lawsuit to seize its assets, this time in Ecuador. Such collection lawsuits are pending against Chevron in Canada and Brazil.

Ecuador Judge Liliana Ortiz on Friday signed an order giving Chevron until midnight tonight to deposit the funds necessary to remediate the oil contamination, which included the dumping of more than 16 billion gallons of toxic waste from oil production into Amazon waterways.

Judge Ortiz’s order comes after almost 19 years of litigation.

The case, Aguinda v. ChevronTexaco, began on November 3, 1993 when 30,000 indigenous people and farmers from Ecuador’s Amazon filed a class action suit against Texaco in New York federal court alleging massive oil contamination of the rainforest.

For 10 years, Texaco argued before U.S. judges that the case should be transferred to Ecuador’s courts. In 2002, a U.S. federal judge granted Texaco’s motion and removed the case to Ecuador on the condition that Texaco submit to jurisdiction there and be bound by any ruling of the Ecuadorian courts.

In the meantime, Chevron bought Texaco in 2001, assuming its liabilities and defense of the case.

Texaco operated in Ecuador from 1964 to 1992, building hundreds of oil production facilities. The trial judge in Lagio Agrio found overwhelming evidence that the company dumped billions of gallons of toxic waste into Amazon waterways as a cost-saving measure.

Five indigenous groups in the area have been harmed by the pollution that covers an area the size of Rhode Island. The contamination also caused an outbreak of cancer that has killed or threatens to kill thousands of people in the area, according to evidence before the court.

Judge Ortiz’s order is the final step under Ecuador civil procedure to certify the 188-page trial court judgment, which was issued on February 11, 2011. That judgement was unanimously affirmed on appeal in early January. It set the amount of the judgment at $18.2 billion.

Last week, Judge Ortiz raised the final amount of the award to $19.041 billion after calculating various mandatory costs required by Ecuador law.

Chevron stripped most of its primary assets, including service stations, from Ecuador years ago and the company no longer operates in the country.

Pablo Fajardo, the lead Ecuador lawyer on the case, says that for practical purposes, Judge Ortiz’s order allows the rainforest communities to execute the Ecuador judgment against Chevron’s remaining assets in their home country.

Fajardo estimates Chevron’s remaining assets in Ecuador are worth roughly $200 million, including a $96 million court judgment the company won recently in an international arbitration proceeding against Ecuador’s government.

Judge Ortiz’s order also puts the plaintiffs in a stronger legal position to pursue recognition of the Ecuador judgment abroad under various international treaties and domestic law statutes.

Collection lawsuits are pending against Chevron in Canada and Brazil, where the company has billions of dollars worth of assets. The plaintiffs are asking courts to seize these assets to satisfy the judgment and finance a cleanup of the oil contamination, said Fajardo.

“People in Ecuador are dying because of Chevron’s pollution and company’s utter contempt for the rule of law,” said Fajardo. “Chevron is going to have to be forced by courts to comply with its legal obligations.”

Chevron maintains the plaintiffs’ allegations that it is responsible for alleged environmental and social harms in the Oriente region of Ecuador are “false.”
  
Chevron says the company never conducted oil production operations in Ecuador, and its subsidiary Texaco Petroleum Co. (TexPet) “fully remediated its share of environmental impacts arising from oil production operations, before leaving Ecuador in 1992.”

“After the remediation was certified by all agencies of the Ecuadorian government responsible for oversight, TexPet received a complete release from Ecuador’s national, provincial, and municipal governments that extinguished all claims before Chevron acquired TexPet in 2001,” the company says.

“All legitimate scientific evidence exonerates Chevron and proves that the remediated sites pose no significant risks to human health or the environment,” Chevron says on its website.

If Chevron refuses to pay the court judgment, the company will face a greater risk of liability in the enforcement actions already pending, said Karen Hinton, the U.S. spokesperson for the indigenous and farmer plaintiffs.

If Chevron defaults, Fajardo said his legal team will file court actions to seize the intellectual property rights of various Chevron brands in Ecuador, including Havoline.

Source

Capital - will overrun you then outrun you, from your hometown and around the globe, fucking up your shit… 

(via sabots-are-for-sabotage)


Jun 29

May 4
thepeoplesrecord:

The Obama administration bows down to oil companies - yet again.
Obama announced a proposed rule that would require companies to disclose chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing (also known as fracking). However, in a compromise with corporations, such as ExxonMobil and XTO Energy, companies would only have to disclose such information after the well has been drilled, not before.
The original policy would have required companies to disclose chemicals at least 30 days prior to drilling. But Obama cracked under pressure by oil industry lobbyists to loosen regulations on oil & gas drilling.
Fracking has been known to contaminate groundwater, cause tremors & earthquakes, pollute at incredible rates, cause cancer from mishandling of waste & cause other health concerns from contaminated water, such as headaches, nausea, coughing & even memory loss.
Source

So freaking ironic. Obama’s crew just released an add against the Romney campaign, painting them as slaves to Big Oil, and  Obama as all squeaky clean and green.If we do a few minutes of homework and record checking, it’s easy to see that the Obama administration has indeed “bowed down to big oil”, as thepeoplesrecord pointed out.So, like the Obama campaign suggested in their add, I’m gonna get on “Tumblr or whatever that is”, and call their bluff. Incredible hypocrisy Class A bullshit 

thepeoplesrecord:

The Obama administration bows down to oil companies - yet again.

Obama announced a proposed rule that would require companies to disclose chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing (also known as fracking). However, in a compromise with corporations, such as ExxonMobil and XTO Energy, companies would only have to disclose such information after the well has been drilled, not before.

The original policy would have required companies to disclose chemicals at least 30 days prior to drilling. But Obama cracked under pressure by oil industry lobbyists to loosen regulations on oil & gas drilling.

Fracking has been known to contaminate groundwater, cause tremors & earthquakes, pollute at incredible rates, cause cancer from mishandling of waste & cause other health concerns from contaminated water, such as headaches, nausea, coughing & even memory loss.

Source

So freaking ironic. Obama’s crew just released an add against the Romney campaign, painting them as slaves to Big Oil, and  Obama as all squeaky clean and green.

If we do a few minutes of homework and record checking, it’s easy to see that the Obama administration has indeed “bowed down to big oil”, as thepeoplesrecord pointed out.

So, like the Obama campaign suggested in their add, I’m gonna get on “Tumblr or whatever that is”, and call their bluff. 

Incredible hypocrisy 

Class A bullshit 


Feb 25

Tweet from BP: “Please, write your representatives and tell them you’ve forgotten about the Gulf of Mexico.”

This is for realz. No lie. Check it out here

Please, write your representatives and tell them you’ve forgotten about the Gulf of Mexico.  


Feb 19
This is greatSo much truth in satireThanks again, Andy Singer 

This is great

So much truth in satire

Thanks again, Andy Singer 


Dec 16

How global capital “drinks your milkshake”



Everybody remembers this part from There Will Be Blood

I thought of this clip as I was reading this article from in the Financial Times.

Iraqi officials are upset at the lack of US and British companies investing in Iraq. While foreign capital is winning contracts right and left, US and British governments have been holding back their companies for political reasons. They want to downplay the suspicion that these countries were involved in Iraq primarily for business interests. But now that these foreign powers have cracked open Iraq and installed a “liberal democracy”, we can be sure that the way Iraq’s resources will be used will be determined by foreign business interests and the officials that cater to them. 

Minimal money will go to the general good of the Iraqi people, maximum profits will go to foreign business, in the mean time, I’m sure that horrible labor relations will develop between the foreign capital and the Iraqi workers that are hired… well, that is if any are hired at all… Chinese investment and development contracts are notorious for using all-Chinese staff, which creates even less jobs in the domestic economy.

In the words of Daniel Plainview, global capital’s main objective is “DRAAAAAAIIINNNAAAAGGGEEE!!!” …for profit, at all costs… unless we organize and change the game


Oct 29

NYT Headline: West Sees Libya as Ripe at Last for Businesses

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGG!!!!!

Check out this article. I don’t know how much more obvious it can get. 

Wanna know about business interest in our foreign policy?

"Western security, construction and infrastructure companies that see profit-making opportunities receding in Iraq and Afghanistan have turned their sights on Libya, now free of four decades of dictatorship. Entrepreneurs are abuzz about the business potential of a country with huge needs and the oil to pay for them, plus the competitive advantage of Libyan gratitude toward the United States and its NATO partners."

Liberators indeed… 

Let’s hope that there might be a thin film of democracy around Libya that is capable of retaining a small fraction of the wealth produced by its natural resources so that it can be funneled back to its people

Schools, hospitals, community centers… where is the voice of the people in all these business transactions? Where?

Nowhere… it’s all NATO, warlords and Harvard business schools. 

How can Libya’s oil be made to work for the people? A sound, representative, responsible and accountable government might be able to help. But how could that ever arrise so quickly out of the ashes of this civil war?

Business will come first. “Democracy” will be an afterthought.